Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: CSS Positioning

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1

    CSS Positioning

    CSS Positioning

    Positioning can be tricky sometimes!
    Decide which element to display in front!
    Elements can overlap!

    Positioning

    The CSS positioning properties allow you to position an element.
    It can also place an element behind another, and specify what
    should happen when an element's content is too big.

    Elements can be positioned using the top, bottom, left, and right properties.
    However, these properties will not work unless the position property is set first.
    They also work differently depending on the positioning method.

    There are four different positioning methods.

    Static Positioning

    HTML elements are positioned static by default. A static positioned element
    is always positioned according to the normal flow of the page.
    Static positioned elements are not affected by the top, bottom, left, and right properties.

    Fixed Positioning

    An element with fixed position is positioned relative to the browser window.
    It will not move even if the window is scrolled:
    Example
    p.pos_fixed
    {
    position:fixed;
    top:30px;
    right:5px;
    }

    Note: IE7 and IE8 support the fixed value only if a !DOCTYPE is specified.

    Fixed positioned elements are removed from the normal flow. The document
    and other elements behave like the fixed positioned element does not exist.
    Fixed positioned elements can overlap other elements.

    Relative Positioning

    A relative positioned element is positioned relative to its normal position.
    Example
    h2.pos_left
    {
    position:relative;
    left:-20px;
    }
    h2.pos_right
    {
    position:relative;
    left:20px;
    }

    The content of relatively positioned elements can be moved and overlap other
    elements, but the reserved space for the element is still preserved in the normal flow.
    Example
    h2.pos_top
    {
    position:relative;
    top:-50px;
    }

    Relatively positioned elements are often used as container blocks for absolutely positioned elements.

    Absolute Positioning

    An absolute position element is positioned relative to the first parent element that has a position other than static. If no such element is found, the containing block is <html>:
    Example
    h2
    {
    position:absolute;
    left:100px;
    top:150px;
    }

    Absolutely positioned elements are removed from the normal flow.
    The document and other elements behave like the absolutely positioned
    element does not exist.

    Absolutely positioned elements can overlap other elements.

    Overlapping Elements

    When elements are positioned outside the normal flow, they can overlap other elements.

    The z-index property specifies the stack order of an element (which element should be placed in front of, or behind, the others).

    An element can have a positive or negative stack order:
    Example
    img
    {
    position:absolute;
    left:0px;
    top:0px;
    z-index:-1
    }

    An element with greater stack order is always in front of an element with a
    lower stack order.

    Note: If two positioned elements overlap, without a z-index specified, the element
    positioned last in the HTML code will be shown on top.

    Find Latest Job Openings

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by bennielor View Post
    CSS Positioning

    Positioning can be tricky sometimes!
    Decide which element to display in front!
    Elements can overlap!

    Positioning

    The CSS positioning properties allow you to position an element.
    It can also place an element behind another, and specify what
    should happen when an element's content is too big.

    Elements can be positioned using the top, bottom, left, and right properties.
    However, these properties will not work unless the position property is set first.
    They also work differently depending on the positioning method.

    There are four different positioning methods.

    Static Positioning

    HTML elements are positioned static by default. A static positioned element
    is always positioned according to the normal flow of the page.
    Static positioned elements are not affected by the top, bottom, left, and right properties.

    Fixed Positioning

    An element with fixed position is positioned relative to the browser window.
    It will not move even if the window is scrolled:
    Example
    p.pos_fixed
    {
    position:fixed;
    top:30px;
    right:5px;
    }

    Note: IE7 and IE8 support the fixed value only if a !DOCTYPE is specified.

    Fixed positioned elements are removed from the normal flow. The document
    and other elements behave like the fixed positioned element does not exist.
    Fixed positioned elements can overlap other elements.

    Relative Positioning

    A relative positioned element is positioned relative to its normal position.
    Example
    h2.pos_left
    {
    position:relative;
    left:-20px;
    }
    h2.pos_right
    {
    position:relative;
    left:20px;
    }

    The content of relatively positioned elements can be moved and overlap other
    elements, but the reserved space for the element is still preserved in the normal flow.
    Example
    h2.pos_top
    {
    position:relative;
    top:-50px;
    }

    Relatively positioned elements are often used as container blocks for absolutely positioned elements.

    Absolute Positioning

    An absolute position element is positioned relative to the first parent element that has a position other than static. If no such element is found, the containing block is <html>:
    Example
    h2
    {
    position:absolute;
    left:100px;
    top:150px;
    }

    Absolutely positioned elements are removed from the normal flow.
    The document and other elements behave like the absolutely positioned
    element does not exist.

    Absolutely positioned elements can overlap other elements.

    Overlapping Elements

    When elements are positioned outside the normal flow, they can overlap other elements.

    The z-index property specifies the stack order of an element (which element should be placed in front of, or behind, the others).

    An element can have a positive or negative stack order:
    Example
    img
    {
    position:absolute;
    left:0px;
    top:0px;
    z-index:-1
    }

    An element with greater stack order is always in front of an element with a
    lower stack order.

    Note: If two positioned elements overlap, without a z-index specified, the element
    positioned last in the HTML code will be shown on top.

    Find Latest Job Openings
    Thanx for sharing this article.
    It is very useful in web designing..
    I think all the CSS information is covered in this article..

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    14
    Nice to read this great informative post,
    Thanks

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4
    The default positioning for all elements is position:static, which means the element is not positioned and occurs where it normally would in the document.
    ________
    Teamspeak rental
    TS server

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

  Find Web Hosting      
  Shared Web Hosting UNIX & Linux Web Hosting Windows Web Hosting Adult Web Hosting
  ASP ASP.NET Web Hosting Reseller Web Hosting VPS Web Hosting Managed Web Hosting
  Cloud Web Hosting Dedicated Server E-commerce Web Hosting Cheap Web Hosting


Premium Partners:



Visit forums.thewebhostbiz.com: to discuss the web hosting business, buy and sell websites and domain names, and discuss current web hosting tools and software.